Northern Circuit

Does it make sense to visit Machu Picchu in January

Traveling to Machu Picchu in January comes with some risk because it's the height of the rainy season, but people do  go, and have a great time.

This is a photo taken at Machu Picchu in mid-January 2014. Not too wet, and it was definitely less crowded than the “high season” from June through September.

We received the following email from a former client on behalf of friends who are considering a trip to Peru after the New Year:

I have friends that are looking for an adventure in January and are considering coming to Peru and making the trip to Machu Picchu. However, they are concerned about it being the rainy season. What are your thoughts on a machu picchu trip in January?

You can read our reply:

Travel News: Coast Rail planned for Peru

Peru is planning a $9.5 billion Coast Rail project that would connect the capital Lima with popular tourist destinations to the north like Piura, Chiclayo and Trujillo, and with the southern Pisco-producing region of Ica.

The announcement about construction of the 832-mile train line was made over the weekend by Transportation Minister José Gallardo.

Your Peru vacation travel options could be about to increase with a proposed Coastal Rail Line

Free exhibit of ancient artifacts from El Chorro tombs

If you are doing a tour in Northern Peru in the next few week, there is free exhibit through mid-March 2014 of artifacts excavated at El Chorro.

Photo: Agencia Andina

Back in October 2009, Walter Alva, the preeminent archaeologist of Northern Peru, decided to focus his attention on the El Chorro archaeological zone, with little expectation of making any significant finds, according to daily El Comercio.

The site, located in Pomalca, seven miles (12 kilometers) from Chiclayo had been overrun by scores of squatter families, and thoroughly pitted and sacked by the looters Alva has spent his long career battling against.

But much to his team’s surprise, within two months they were able to identify and excavate 33 intact tombs filled with artifacts of ceramic, wood, bone, textiles and metal, including some of the earliest known copper metallurgy from that region of Peru.

Of the roughly 600 artifacts recovered, 127 went on display last week for a free, two-month exhibit in Royal Tombs of Sipan Museum in Lambayeque.

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